Thursday , July 18 2019
Home / argentina / It's official: It's a real chance to find a sea dog

It's official: It's a real chance to find a sea dog



Australian scientists have found that 135 times more likely that swimmers at the beach will encounter dolphins than the marine dog.

The footage shot by the dwarf shows at least one big white whale, hammerhead and lip that floats along the northern NSW coast, but shows much more dolphins, whales, and even fever.

Brendan Kelaher, a professor of maritime science and management at Southern Cross University, said that although the original purpose of the study was to consider the viability of using unmanned aerial vehicles to enhance beach safety, the unexpected outcome was capturing shots of marine creatures that are hard to get any other way.

The research was conducted by Professor Kelaher and a team from the Southern Cross University in collaboration with the Department of Primary Industry of NSW as part of the $ 16 Million Marine Management Strategy.

A large white lilac was observed along the coast of northern NSW. The images were shot with unmanned aerial vehicles used for exploration. Credits: University of Southern Cross and NSW DPI.

A large white lilac was observed along the coast of northern NSW. The images were shot with unmanned aerial vehicles used for exploration. Credits: University of Southern Cross and NSW DPI.

These rain rays were observed along the coast of northern NSW. Credits: University of Southern Cross and NSW DPI.

These rain rays were observed along the coast of northern NSW. Credits: University of Southern Cross and NSW DPI.

The team used unmanned aerial vehicles to track the beaches near Bayron Bay, Balline, Lennox Heada, and Evans Head, where the lips of the lips have been recorded in the past.

More than 4100 large sea creatures have been recorded, but 47-year-old professor Kelaher says more seabirds have been observed.
"On these beaches in the last five years you would occasionally see pretty dangerous sharks, but they were relatively rare," he said.

"We found an incredibly diverse marine world and fauna that live on beaches.

"It's phenomenal, we've seen a massive fever of up to 400 animals and shaping crazy geometric patterns, almost as somebody did in photoshop."

Professor Kelaher said that the observed dolphins would play with the sea dogs and disturb the cormorants or the whims.

"They have big brains and have fun," he said.

"That is why there is a much greater chance of seeing dolphins on the beach because they are curious and really interested in what is happening."

Dron pilot and lecturer Professor Brendan Kelaher of the National Center for Marine Science at Charlesworth Bay. The NSW DPI has been using the beach watches for the last three years as part of the NSW's Marine Management Strategy. The Southern Cross research team carefully analyzed unmanned aerial footage and counted more than 4100 large marine animals. Source: Elise Derwin

Dron pilot and lecturer Professor Brendan Kelaher of the National Center for Marine Science at Charlesworth Bay. The NSW DPI has been using the beach watches for the last three years as part of the NSW's Marine Management Strategy. The Southern Cross research team carefully analyzed unmanned aerial footage and counted more than 4100 large marine animals. Source: Elise Derwin

The academician said the study confirmed that darts had become a useful tool for monitoring beach safety.

"Dron can look for sea dogs, they can let people know the siren to get out of the water," he said.

"Or, if someone gets caught in the break, they can drop off a personal float and alarm, which contributes to our ability to keep people safe."

Professor Kelaher also said that the technology of unmanned aviation enabled a new way of getting insight into the marine animal world.

"The technology of unmanned aerial vehicles is fantastic because it gave us a glimpse of the sky we did not have before because helicopters pay for things while with unmanned aircraft we get insight into the sea world we did not yet have," he said.

"They're really amazing things on our beaches, like a bunch of dolphins and Bryde's whales."

"We've seen them eat in the meadows of the shore. Whiskers would swim and swarm the dolphins, it was really impressive to watch."

Research findings are published in Marine and Freshwater Research.


Source link