Wednesday , January 20 2021

Cloudflare launches the application of DNS 1.1.1.1 for Android and iOS



Cloudflare launches the application of DNS 1.1.1.1 for Android and iOS

DNA best illustrates the giant picture of the letters D N and S. I hope this helps.

CLOUDFLARE has released that its open DNS server is available for smartphones.

Service 1.1.1.1 can now be accessed via Android and iOS apps that offer one-touch touch switching between the DNS network and the Cloudflare network.

Of course, there are certain melodrama in all of this – what Cloudflare has launched is the application. 1.1.1.1 Consumer services arrived in April and could be used by anyone if there is a crane – what is actually launched here is an application to make it a non-brainer.

But why would you want it? There are many reasons.

First and foremost, the use of open DNS such as Cloudflare, OpenDNS or Google DNS is security. By directing your traffic through it you will get an encrypted service that is left without the rest of your ISP and making it a little harder to monitor.

Then it's speed. Very often the alternatives are significantly nippier. In the United States and the United Kingdom, the difference may be inconspicuous (or significant – you only need to try out what works for you), but in parts of the globe with slower connectivity, this change in DNS can significantly increase you.

Finally, there is freedom. In countries where Internet access is blocked at some level, the use of alternative DNS configurations has allowed people to ban access denied access and limited content, and may contain disinformation or opinions that you should not have.

"We have launched 1.1.1.1 to offer customers a better choice for fast and private Internet browsing," said Cloudflare Matthew King Former Leader, "1.1.1.1 makes it easy for users to unlock fast and encrypted DNS on their phones."

Let's be clear though it's not a silver bullet. Your privacy is not absolute with this or any other DNS service. You will need more (for example, VPN) to make sure. Not entirely safe. Just safer. μ

Further reading


Source link