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From Givenchy to Versace, big brands apologize to China



"I never wanted to disrespect Chinese national sovereignty and that is why I wanted to apologize personally for such inaccuracy and any distress that might cause it," reads Versace's post.

Actress Yang Mi, an ambassador for the Versace brand in China, issued a statement saying she would part with the label.

Coaches and Givenchy followed suit after Internet users dug up T-shirts citing Hong Kong brands as independent countries, and Calvin Klein apologized on Monday for apparently identifying Hong Kong, Macao and Taiwan on his website.

Chinese model Liu Wen has terminated her contract with a trainer after designing t-shirts that set Hong Kong, Macao and Taiwan as independent countries. The model publicly apologized to Weib for working with the American fashion brand, saying, "I'm sorry for the harm done to the public by poor brand choice. I love my homeland and firmly protect national sovereignty."

The Communist Party Central Committee on Political and Legal Affairs published an article on its WeChat account recommending Cathay Pacific, Hong Kong Airlines and Versace to listen to a song called "Liang Liang." Meaning "cold, cold", "layman's lang" is internet slang for something that is hopeless.

"The anger of the Chinese people is not only verbal, it will turn into action. The Chinese people have the determination, the will and the ability to create you completely 'lang laang,'" the Communist Party department wrote on its social media page.

The Chinese market is crucial for luxury brands.

The Chinese market is crucial for luxury brands. Credit:Bloomberg

"China's sovereign interests are not things worth exchanging!"

On Monday, Japanese sportswear company Asics joined a long line of brands apologizing after listing Hong Kong and Taiwan as independent countries on its English-language website.

"We sincerely apologize for what it is [Chinese] The press pointed to Asics' official website and solemnly stated that Asics China and all our employees have consistently upheld the territorial integrity of our homeland, the principle of "One China", and the fact that both Hong Kong and Taiwan are inalienable. part of China, "according to a statement posted on Weibo.

The rebellion is the latest in a long history of brands suffering from national sensitivities in various countries.

Kim Kardashian sparked outrage in Japan and on social media in June after marking her new Kimono-style clothing line. The star is accused of disrespecting Japanese culture and stealing the name of traditional Japanese lingerie. At the time, many used the hashtag #KimOhNo to express disgust and demand an apology.

Kardashian later released a statement saying she would change her name.

In May, US merchant Gap quickly apologized to China for an incomplete ticket printed on one of his Taiwan-omitted T-shirts and failed to show what China calls "Southern Tibet." The shirt sold in Canada also failed to draw a line around China's territorial claims in the South China Sea.

Chinese model Liu Wen has terminated her contract with a trainer after designing t-shirts that set Hong Kong, Macao and Taiwan as independent countries.

Chinese model Liu Wen has terminated her contract with a trainer after designing t-shirts that set Hong Kong, Macao and Taiwan as independent countries.Credit:AP

With the increase in the number of wheels, the company said it respected "China's sovereignty and territorial integrity" and offered an apology.

"We have learned that the Gap T-shirt sold in some overseas markets misrepresented the correct map of China. We sincerely apologize for this unintentional mistake," the statement said.

China received another apology in January, this time from Marriott International. In a letter to members of the awards club, the company asked customers about their countries of residence, listing Tibet, Hong Kong, Macao and Taiwan among options – a move that drew anger from the Chinese government.

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