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Solving the mystery of motor neuron mimicry



Above: Donors Lynda and Richard Rouse.<! –->

Above: Donors Lynda and Richard Rouse.

Inclusive body myositis (IBM) is a rare muscular disorder characterized by inflammation, wear and tear and muscle weakness. It occurs only in adults, the most commonly acquired muscle-consuming disease in people over 45 years of age.

Symptoms include progressive disability with loss of function in the legs, arms and fingers. The risk of serious falls injuries is increased for those who are still mobile. Some people have progressive difficulty swallowing. The cause is unknown, the diagnosis is difficult and there is currently no cure. About 1,200 Australians are thought to have IBM.

"It is often difficult to distinguish inclusive body myositis from motor neuron disease. Muscle biopsy, a painful and invasive procedure where tissue and cells are removed, is currently the only way to make an accurate diagnosis, ”said Professor Simon Hawke of the University Center for Brain and Mind.

"Numerous donations like the Russians" make it possible to investigate a rare disease – for the benefit of not only people with the condition but also the wider community. Our findings will shed light on the mechanism of disease of other diseases that cause muscle weakness, such as motor neuron disease, "said Vice Chancellor and University Director Dr. Michael Spence.

Research is the next critical step toward improving patient diagnosis and outcomes. This will be facilitated by the establishment The Rouse Initiative in the Study of Body Myositis.

"IBM includes a body immune system that attacks itself. The cause is believed to be a combination of genetic and environmental factors, ”said Professor Simon Hawke of the Center for Brain and Mind.

One theory that needs further investigation is that inclusion myositis of the body is caused by the accumulation of toxic elements within the muscles associated with age, causing an inflammatory response accompanied by muscle degeneration.


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