Monday , July 22 2019
Home / australia / World AIDS Day in Brisbane: Changing the way we think about HIV

World AIDS Day in Brisbane: Changing the way we think about HIV



MAIN medical advances and self-testing approaches have enormous impact on changing outcomes in people with HIV diagnoses, but the attitudes that still need to make the biggest move.

Prior to the 30th anniversary of the World AIDS Day, advocates and those living with the virus called for greater community understanding, acceptance and access to life-changing medicines.

media_cameraGP Fiona Bisshop supports the 30th anniversary of the World AIDS Day

Brisbane-based GP Dr. Fiona Bisshop, specializing in HIV, sexual health and transdermal health, despite major changes around the globe, "the biggest obstacle to removing is still stigma and ignorance."

"There are still people who do not know that they have HIV, and more needs to be taken to ensure that everyone in danger is tested and given the appropriate treatment, not only men who have sex with men, but also persons which have sex partners from countries that are excessively overweight and those who are sex while abroad. "

Dr. Bisshop said the changes in attitudes, slowing down, were over the homosexual community, but the stigma was still a problem.

"Socially, people with HIV may still be worried about revealing their status to potential partners for fear of rejection," she said.

"Unfortunately, outside the gay community, attitudes have not moved too much and more needs to be done to educate the wider community."

GET DIGITAL APPROACH TO 50C DAY

Documentary director Staffan Hildebrand recorded three decades in Australia and Cambodia's response to HIV and AIDS.

Prince Harry joins Sir John Elton to launch a global coalition for HIV treatment

Dr. Bisshop said that one of the most important messages was U = U.

"Undetectable equals Untransmissable – The person with HIV who is in the treatment and has an undetiable blood test virus is basically unable to transmit the virus, meaning that they can have a normal sexual life with their partner without fear of passing it on, and heterosexual couples can achieve pregnancy without fear of transmission to the virus, "she said.

"We also have virtually no HIV transmission from mother to child – well tolerated safe medicines."

Where to join events and candles, including

World AIDS Day – Candlelight Vigil – Brisbane

Saturday, December 1, 2018

18:45

Queen Street Mall Stadium

Queen Street

BRISBANE

The Red Party of the World AIDS Day

From 20 o'clock, Beat Megaclub, Fortitude Valley.

media_cameraBritish Prince Harry and Meghan Markle are running as they arrive at the humanitarian World AIDS Day show in Nottingham Contemporary in Nottingham, central England, on December 1, 2017. Prince Harry and Meghan Markle visited Nottingham in their first set of engagement together announcing their engagement. During the first engagement on Charity Day at the Terrence Higgins Trust World AIDS Day, Prince and Markle met with representatives of many institutes and charities dealing with specific work on HIV / AIDS. / AFP PHOTO / POOL / Adrian DENNIS
media_cameraDecember 1 World AIDS Day. FILE: JUSTIN BRIERTY

Dr. Bisshop welcomed the statement this week that the Federal Government has announced that access to the home test case will now be available.

Atomic Self Test, approved by the Terapeutic Goods Management, will be available for about $ 40 and $ 6.50 only for patients with a concession.

"This will overcome the difficulties that some people may have during testing – especially people in rural or remote areas, and people who are unable to access or afford the understanding of health care providers," Dr. Bisshop said.

As Vice President of the Sexual Health Society Qld, Dr. Bisshop stated that living with HIV in Australia in 2018 was a significantly different situation compared to 30 years ago.

"HIV was the death penalty for most, and so much lost from AIDS. Contrast can not be bigger so far – HIV positive people are being treated for treatment when diagnosed and living a normal life, and they are expected to do so normal life span, "she said.

"Even when compared to 10 years ago, the therapy is better. Now we have one tablet that will completely suppress the virus without any side effects, meaning that people with HIV can live normal lives and never go to HIV-related diseases. The likelihood of developing AIDS is now zero for people who are stable on drugs. "

media_cameraNEW YORK, NY – DECEMBER 01: Actor Ruby Rose participates in the ONE campaign and (RED) celebration of the World AIDS Day, celebrated the incredible progress made in combating extreme poverty and HIV / AIDS, extraordinary leaders , devoted activists and passionate partners who made this progress. In Carnegie Hall, December 1, 2015 in New York. (Photo: Dave Kotinsky / Getty Images for ONE campaign)

treatments

  • Great progress in "biomedical prevention".
  • PREP or prophylaxis before HIV exposure, which means that HIV-negative people daily take one pill to prevent transmission of HIV. PREP is very, very effective – there are only a few reported cases around the world due to failure when properly taken.
  • Treatment as a Prevention, which means that a person living with HIV takes medicines that reduce the level of HIV virus in the blood, resulting in what we call "undetectable viral loads".
  • With undetiable viral loads, a person living with HIV can not sexually transmit the virus.

For Chris Howard, who is executive manager of Queensland's positive people, now lives with HIV "becoming a chronic disease that can be managed by most people."

"Almost 90% of people with HIV diagnosed and living in Queensland are on treatment, most of whom have sustained viral loads, which means they can not pass HIV with their sexual partners," he said.

media_cameraChris Howard, executive program manager in Queensland's positive person (right)

"HIV is often transmitted by people who are not aware of HIV. Testing technology and access to testing have come a long way with 20 minutes of rapid HIV testing."

Mr. Howard said that most people are treated early to expect to live a normal life expectancy, but one of the most difficult things to overcome is the "unacceptable stigma".

"PLHIV still rejects services based on their HIV status and is treated less favorably than others in accessing health, housing, employment, and other services, and in their social lives," Howard said.

"Although there has been some improvement, ignorance and fear that the generation of the dark campaign in the early days are still going on.

There should be no reason to discriminate or stigmatize another human being based on viruses, it is simply unacceptable. "


Source link

Home / australia / World AIDS Day in Brisbane: Changing the way we think about HIV

World AIDS Day in Brisbane: Changing the way we think about HIV



MAIN medical advances and self-testing approaches have enormous impact on changing outcomes in people with HIV diagnoses, but the attitudes that still need to make the biggest move.

Prior to the 30th anniversary of the World AIDS Day, advocates and those living with the virus called for greater community understanding, acceptance and access to life-changing medicines.

media_cameraGP Fiona Bisshop supports the 30th anniversary of the World AIDS Day

Brisbane-based GP Dr. Fiona Bisshop, specializing in HIV, sexual health and transdermal health, despite major changes around the globe, "the biggest obstacle to removing is still stigma and ignorance."

"There are still people who do not know that they have HIV, and more needs to be taken to ensure that everyone in danger is tested and given the appropriate treatment, not only men who have sex with men, but also persons which have sex partners from countries that are excessively overweight and those who are sex while abroad. "

Dr. Bisshop said the changes in attitudes, slowing down, were over the homosexual community, but the stigma was still a problem.

"Socially, people with HIV may still be worried about revealing their status to potential partners for fear of rejection," she said.

"Unfortunately, outside the gay community, attitudes have not moved too much and more needs to be done to educate the wider community."

GET DIGITAL APPROACH TO 50C DAY

Documentary director Staffan Hildebrand recorded three decades in Australia and Cambodia's response to HIV and AIDS.

Prince Harry joins Sir John Elton to launch a global coalition for HIV treatment

Dr. Bisshop said that one of the most important messages was U = U.

"Undetectable equals Untransmissable – The person with HIV who is in the treatment and has an undetiable blood test virus is basically unable to transmit the virus, meaning that they can have a normal sexual life with their partner without fear of passing it on, and heterosexual couples can achieve pregnancy without fear of transmission to the virus, "she said.

"We also have virtually no HIV transmission from mother to child – well tolerated safe medicines."

Where to join events and candles, including

World AIDS Day – Candlelight Vigil – Brisbane

Saturday, December 1, 2018

18:45

Queen Street Mall Stadium

Queen Street

BRISBANE

The Red Party of the World AIDS Day

From 20 o'clock, Beat Megaclub, Fortitude Valley.

media_cameraBritish Prince Harry and Meghan Markle are running as they arrive at the humanitarian World AIDS Day show in Nottingham Contemporary in Nottingham, central England, on December 1, 2017. Prince Harry and Meghan Markle visited Nottingham in their first set of engagement together announcing their engagement. During the first engagement on Charity Day at the Terrence Higgins Trust World AIDS Day, Prince and Markle met with representatives of many institutes and charities dealing with specific work on HIV / AIDS. / AFP PHOTO / POOL / Adrian DENNIS
media_cameraDecember 1 World AIDS Day. FILE: JUSTIN BRIERTY

Dr. Bisshop welcomed the statement this week that the Federal Government has announced that access to the home test case will now be available.

Atomic Self Test, approved by the Terapeutic Goods Management, will be available for about $ 40 and $ 6.50 only for patients with a concession.

"This will overcome the difficulties that some people may have during testing – especially people in rural or remote areas, and people who are unable to access or afford the understanding of health care providers," Dr. Bisshop said.

As Vice President of the Sexual Health Society Qld, Dr. Bisshop stated that living with HIV in Australia in 2018 was a significantly different situation compared to 30 years ago.

"HIV was the death penalty for most, and so much lost from AIDS. Contrast can not be bigger so far – HIV positive people are being treated for treatment when diagnosed and living a normal life, and they are expected to do so normal life span, "she said.

"Even when compared to 10 years ago, the therapy is better. Now we have one tablet that will completely suppress the virus without any side effects, meaning that people with HIV can live normal lives and never go to HIV-related diseases. The likelihood of developing AIDS is now zero for people who are stable on drugs. "

media_cameraNEW YORK, NY – DECEMBER 01: Actor Ruby Rose participates in the ONE campaign and (RED) celebration of the World AIDS Day, celebrated the incredible progress made in combating extreme poverty and HIV / AIDS, extraordinary leaders , devoted activists and passionate partners who made this progress. In Carnegie Hall, December 1, 2015 in New York. (Photo: Dave Kotinsky / Getty Images for ONE campaign)

treatments

  • Great progress in "biomedical prevention".
  • PREP or prophylaxis before HIV exposure, which means that HIV-negative people daily take one pill to prevent transmission of HIV. PREP is very, very effective – there are only a few reported cases around the world due to failure when properly taken.
  • Treatment as a Prevention, which means that a person living with HIV takes medicines that reduce the level of HIV virus in the blood, resulting in what we call "undetectable viral loads".
  • With undetiable viral loads, a person living with HIV can not sexually transmit the virus.

For Chris Howard, who is executive manager of Queensland's positive people, now lives with HIV "becoming a chronic disease that can be managed by most people."

"Almost 90% of people with HIV diagnosed and living in Queensland are on treatment, most of whom have sustained viral loads, which means they can not pass HIV with their sexual partners," he said.

media_cameraChris Howard, executive program manager in Queensland's positive person (right)

"HIV is often transmitted by people who are not aware of HIV. Testing technology and access to testing have come a long way with 20 minutes of rapid HIV testing."

Mr. Howard said that most people are treated early to expect to live a normal life expectancy, but one of the most difficult things to overcome is the "unacceptable stigma".

"PLHIV still rejects services based on their HIV status and is treated less favorably than others in accessing health, housing, employment, and other services, and in their social lives," Howard said.

"Although there has been some improvement, ignorance and fear that the generation of the dark campaign in the early days are still going on.

There should be no reason to discriminate or stigmatize another human being based on viruses, it is simply unacceptable. "


Source link