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Updated HPV Vaccine Recommendations Follow the large drop in HPV infection in the new study



Updated HPV Vaccine Recommendations Follow the large drop in HPV infection in the new study

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In this archive photo, August 28, 2006, the doctor holds a Gardasil Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine in his office in Chicago. (AP Photo / Charles Rex Arbogast, file)

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Adults younger than 45 are now advised to talk to their doctor about a human papillomavirus vaccine (HPV), which prevents 3% of all types of cancer in women and 2% of all types of cancer in men. Approximately 34,000 cancer per year in the United States. Following the confirmation from the director of the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the recommendations refer to the age of men aged 21 to 26 as well as women.

The decision of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) of the CDC on July 26 came on the same day Lancet has released the largest vaccine efficacy study so far. Meta-analysis of 65 studies showed a decrease of 31% to 83% of HPV infections and genital warts in men and women, depending on age and diagnosis.

HPV is responsible for almost all kinds of cervical cancer, over 90% of anal cancer, 70% of mouth, throat and neck cancer, and over 60% of penis cancer. Although HPV is primarily transmitted through sexual contact, non-sexual transmission occurs.

Previously HPV vaccine was recommended for women and men in the range of two to 14 years or three to 26 years for women and 21 for men. Men aged 22 to 26 can also be vaccinated.

ACIP's unanimous decision to extend the recommendation to 26 years for men is evidence of significant benefits for men. In fact, research shows that men are six times more likely to develop an oral infection with a high risk HPV.

10 to 4 ACIP votes for adults between 27 and 45 who did not receive HPV vaccine insist on joint decision-making with their providers. The HPV vaccine has not been approved by the FDA for adults older than 45 because efficacy data does not exist for this age group.

"The ACIP decision suggests that the data showed" that HPV vaccine is safe and effective in patients aged 27 to 45 and that its use in this age group should be the result of "Joint decision making between patients and their trusted doctors" , said Christopher M. Zahn, vice president of practice at the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG).

"Gynecologists-Obstetricians are encouraged to talk to their patients from 27 to 45 years of age about the potential benefits of HPV vaccination, having reduced efficacy in relation to vaccination in younger target age groups, as well as reducing the risk of high grade disease and cervical cancer the uterus, Zahn said, adding that receiving the vaccine at the recommended age of 11-12 years provides the greatest benefit.

"Women's decisions will also take into account their personal circumstances, inclinations and worries, and the role of gynecologist-ophthalmologist is to provide unbiased, balanced and comprehensive information to facilitate decision-making.

A new study reveals a huge reduction in HPV-related infections

A new study has shown that HPV infection in strains 16 and 18 decreased by 83% in girls aged 13-19 and 66% in women aged 20 to 24 years to eight years after vaccination.

Gardasil strains HPV 16 and 18 are responsible for 70% cervical cancer, vagina, vulva and anus. Gardasil 9 also protects against HPV 6 and 11, causing 90% of genital warts and five other strains (31, 33, 45, 52 and 58). Together, Gardasil 9 strains make up 90% of HPV-associated cancer.

According to a new study, HPV 21, 33 and 45 HPV infections were halved (54%) among vaccinated girls aged 15 to 19 years. Likewise, the diagnosis of genital warts decreased by 67% for these girls and by 48% for boys of the same age. Older men (up to 24 years of age) and women (up to 29 years) also experienced a decrease in genital warts by 31% to 54%.

Cervical stage neoplasms of stage 2, predecessors of cancer, were also halved (51%) among girls aged 15 to 19 and 31% among women aged 20 to 24 years.

The development of cervical cancer may take up to 20 years, so the vaccine, which was first approved in 2006, was not long enough to be a very important factual basis showing a reduction in the incidence of cervical cancer. cancer frequency. The dramatic decrease in HPV infection rates, however, should result in a similar reduction in cancer rates caused by HPV, and vaccine immunity is viable.

Several major HPV vaccine reviews revealed that it was one of the safest available vaccines. Although the stroke itself may be particularly painful, the only commonly reported adverse reactions are pain, redness and pain at the site of injection, and in some adolescents temporary discomfort, common in many adolescent vaccines. , Out of 13,000 people who participated in Gardasil 9 clinical trials, five reported fever, allergy to the vaccine, asthma attack, headache and tonsillitis, although not all of the vaccines were identified.

The most effective way to reduce cervical cancer was and remains a regular review. However, screening reveals only early development of abnormal tissue that can become cancerous, while the HPV vaccine prevents viral infections that cause these abnormalities in the tissue.

Since there is currently no way to detect throat / mouth / neck cancer or anal cancer in women or men (or penile cancer in humans), the HPV vaccine remains the only way to prevent these forms of cancer.

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In this archive photo, August 28, 2006, the doctor holds a Gardasil Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine in his office in Chicago. (AP Photo / Charles Rex Arbogast, file)

RELATED TEXT

Adults under the age of 45 are recommended to seek medical help for a human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, which prevents them – for about a year in the United States. Following the confirmation from the director of the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the recommendations refer to the age of men aged 21 to 26 as well as women.

The decision of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) of the CDC on July 26 came on the same day Lancet has released the largest vaccine efficacy study so far. The falls were determined from 31% to 83% of HPV infections and genital warts in men and women, depending on age and diagnosis.

HPV is responsible for almost all types of cervical cancer again and again. Although HPV is mainly transmitted through sexual contact, it also occurs.

Previously HPV vaccine was administered to women and men in a series of doses up to 14 years or up to three doses. Men aged 22 to 26 can also be vaccinated.

ACIP's unanimous decision to extend the 26-year recommendation to men is evidence of the presence of a vaccine. In fact, research shows that men more often than women develop oral infection with a high-risk HPV strain.

10 to 4 ACIP votes for adults between 27 and 45 who did not receive HPV vaccine insist on joint decision-making with their providers. The HPV vaccine has not been approved by the FDA for adults older than 45 because efficacy data does not exist for this age group.

"The ACIP decision emphasizes that the HPV vaccine is safe and effective in patients aged 27 to 45 and that the use of this vaccine should be the result of a joint decision between patients and their dependable patients." a statement by Dr. Christopher M. Zahn, Vice President of Practice in the US College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG).

"Gynecologists-Obstetricians are encouraged to talk to their patients from 27 to 45 years of age about the potential benefits of HPV vaccination, by reducing the effectiveness of vaccination in younger target groups, as well as reducing the risk of high grade disease and cervical cancer , Zahn said, adding that receiving the vaccine at the recommended age of 11-12 years provides the greatest benefit.

"Women's decisions will also take into account their personal circumstances, inclinations and worries, and the role of gynecologist-ophthalmologist is to provide unbiased, balanced and comprehensive information to facilitate decision-making.

A new study reveals a huge reduction in HPV-related infections

Investigators found that HPV infection in strains 16 and 18 fell 83% in girls aged 13 to 19 and 66% in women aged 20 to 24, up to eight years after vaccination.

Gardasil strains HPV 16 and 18 are responsible for 70% cervical cancer, vagina, vulva and anus. It also protects against HPV 6 and 11 which they cause, and against five other strains (31, 33, 45, 52 and 58). Together, the Gardasil 9 strains represent.

According to a new study, HPV 21, 33 and 45 HPV infections were halved (54%) among vaccinated girls aged 15 to 19 years. Likewise, the diagnosis of genital warts decreased by 67% for these girls and by 48% for boys of the same age. Older men (up to 24 years of age) and women (up to 29 years) also experienced a decrease in genital warts by 31% to 54%.

Cervical stage neoplasms of stage 2, predecessors of cancer, were also halved (51%) among girls aged 15 to 19 and 31% among women aged 20 to 24 years.

The development of cervical cancer may take up to 20 years. The vaccine, therefore, was not long enough to provide a fairly large database that shows a decrease in cancer incidence. The drama should, however, be translated into a similar drop in cancer rates caused by HPV and.

Several available HPV vaccines have been found. Although the stroke itself may be particularly painful, the only commonly reported adverse reactions are pain, redness and pain at the site of injection, and in some adolescents temporary discomfort, common in many adolescent vaccines. , Out of 13,000 people who participated in Gardasil 9 clinical trials, five reported fever, allergy to the vaccine, asthma attack, headache and tonsillitis, although not all of the vaccines were identified.

The most effective way to reduce cervical cancer was and remains. However, screening reveals only early development of abnormal tissue that can become cancerous, while the HPV vaccine prevents viral infections that cause these abnormalities in the tissue.

Since there is currently no way to detect throat / mouth / neck cancer or anal cancer in women or men (or penile cancer in humans), the HPV vaccine remains the only way to prevent these forms of cancer.


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