Sunday , October 20 2019
Home / canada / Buy the Meteorite that nearly destroyed Sibir in this fun Valentine's Day auction

Buy the Meteorite that nearly destroyed Sibir in this fun Valentine's Day auction



Buy the Meteorite that nearly destroyed Sibir in this fun Valentine's Day auction

Looking for a romantic gift of this Valentine's Day? Maybe this meteor that fell to hell on Siberia 1947 for you.

Credits: Christie's

Valentine's Day is coming back to us as well as the extraterrestrial remains – and to celebrate, Christie's auction house sells meteorite heart form rather than hell hell on Siberia a few decades ago.

Heart-shaped spacecraft (Christie's called "Heart of Space") is one of 45 meteorites offered for online auction from February 6 to 14. Although some batches are expected to sell for only $ 500, the Heart Spaceship could bring over $ 500,000, according to Christie's announcement. [Fallen Stars: A Gallery of Famous Meteorites]

Part of the astronomical initial offer of rock comes from its background. According to Christie's web site, the meteorite was one of hundreds of scraps that crumpled with pure iron pieces (90,000 kilograms) and rained across the Sikhote-Alin Mountain in Siberia in February 1947. When these fragments finally collapsed in the mountains, the shock waves smashed the chimneys, crushed the trees, and sounded the sound strikes heard hundreds of miles away. It was very romantic.

While many of the fragments of meteorites were found after the incident of jagged, debris-like debris, the Heart of the Space probably cut off its superior meteor in the atmosphere and subsequently engraved in an aerodynamic form as it rises to the ground at dozens. toward thousands of miles per hour, according to Christie's.

If this piece of flamboyant chaos is too thin for your blood, other particles at the auction include rare meteors filled with extraterrestrial gems (known as palasites), meteorites that have been catapulted from the moon and dropped to Earth, and a 15-ton meteorite Willamette (13, 6 tonnes) – the American Museum of Natural History and "the most famous meteorite in the world", according to Christie's. Whether you can bring one of these glorious stones or not, we hope your valentines rocks.

Originally posted on the day Live Science.


Source link