Sunday , September 22 2019
Home / ethiopia / Like it or hate it, Joe Maddon of the Cubs is one of the best MLB managers

Like it or hate it, Joe Maddon of the Cubs is one of the best MLB managers




<div_content>

Joe Maddon celebrates with Kris Bryant (17) after winning against Washington Nationals. (AP photo / Nick Wass)

RELATED TEXT

League league managers always had to live with a certain amount of stress, regardless of whether their clubs were in a dense bumblebee race or just struggling to overcome their talented opponents.

Governor's pressures come from several sources: writers, television and radio journalists, fans, owners, and players themselves.

The manager is doing his thing – on the stage – before the eyes of critics who like to get used to another man's guess, though rarely have as much information as possible about a certain field situation as he has.

The fact that his reasoning and conduct is constantly being subjected to public scrutiny helps little to nourish the nerves of the manager.

Neither the usual percentage of players who can interfere with these illusions of luxury or lack of self-discipline.

If professionals from other areas had to work under conditions similar to those facing MLB executives, half of them would be sent to the psycho-department before the end of the season.

Bejzbola managers, if nothing else, must learn to coexist with frustration. As they have done over the years, it depends on their ability to punish.

Young Joe Joe Maddon has a leader who has a very good control of his emotions. His most unusual feature is his positivity. He is always optimistic regardless of the situation and has the highest respect and conviction in all players wearing Cubo uniforms. Maddon also respects his opponents, but for the sake of maintaining a healthy mind, he is a master in keeping loose clubs and his team players on the same page.

"You can tell when someone is doing it," said Jon Lester for Maddon Chicago Sun-TimesLast spring he won the writer Gordon Wittenmyer in connection with his meeting with Maddons before signing the contract with the youth. "You can say when somebody fills you with a bunch of bs.s. Within 30 seconds, I knew he was, that's the person he is, that's the thing he believes. And he's very passionate about it.

Maddon is certainly passionate about winning and helping players succeed. But it does not interfere with his rejection or hatred for losing. He is just as competitive in the game as he is in the game, and when he is lost, many managers lose their calm and thoughts.

Billy Martin and Earl Weaver would flee from the steering wheel and would often be in conflict with some of their players.

Sparky Anderson, who never said anything bad, but often crossed over the build of the player even during a bad fall or a streak.

Fred Hutchinson, who skips Tigers, Cardinals and Reds, knew he was breaking things in the club.

Eddie Stanky, who was managing the cardinals, the White Sox, and the Rangers, would go back and forth in the field, monotonously pushing the baton.

Al Lopez, who led the Indiana and White Sox to the flag of A.L., would keep him inside and once told the journalist as he clapped his fingers on the table after a heavy loss, "I will not let this game kill me."

Big Casey Stengel from Yankees and Metsa who controls glory, told stories and maybe joined the drink writers or two a day.

Stengel, of course, had an extraordinary ability to reject his frustrations and hostilities. It would turn the dizziness of its listeners to eloquent non-sequiturs that would leave the novices in the rattling rhythm on their heads trying to figure out what the man was talking about.

The writer of Bejzbola in the hall of the famous Jerome Holtzman, who created the rescue, shared a memory of Stengel. It was a day when Casey visited Wrigley Field in Chicago as the manager of Metso. On the bench before the play time, Holtzman said the reporter decided to make a story about Stengel, not Mets, which was pretty awful at the time.

"How," replied Stengel, "did you get the name of Casey?"

It was a seemingly innocent inquiry that could lead to an interesting story, whether it was facts or fiction.

"Before Stengel breathed three times," said Holtzman, "he sounded like he would listen to his listeners on a non-stop tour through the history of the baseball. "When I first lived in Kansas City," Stengel said, having previously had large yards in the back of the house. They never had any playgrounds, so they had one, but that was the only one, and we used to play in those yards once, and we kicked football and threw it around, got the barrels and put them up there. and try to throw her through basketball.

Now, at that time, I was young and short, and they called me Dutch. My father called me Stengel, Jordan of my mother, and my middle name is Dillon. He was a judge. My mother called me the first name Charles.

Thing The best thing I know is that I went to baseball in 1910 when I went to Kankakee in the North Association and the league fell on July 4th& nbsp; and I'm out of business. I came to the power lines and it should take half the night.

"Once I knew a young girl in New York who had never arrived in New Jersey, but after I got to Kankakee, they would ask me," You from BC? "And I would say," Yes. "That's what it was, they had to change my name." He would say, "He's from K.C., and they would say," Hey K.C. "So the writers started using the name Casey."

Holtzman said that the talk of a journalist with Stengel continued for another 20 minutes with him in connection with playing in the Wisconsin-Illinois 1911 law of the fact that he was compiled by Brooklyn, that Cubans were not interested in him as a player, that he was not a house hit, how some people still call him Dutch, and a college high school student who became an actor before Stengel finished talking to the news before the game, "And so I got the name of Casey."

Stengel had a way to get to his point, but in the way nobody else could be honest, fun and entertaining for the writers.

Maddon was in the same way but completely different from Casey Stengel, who kept the reporters confused about decoding the meaning of his information.

Maddon is always honest, accurate and fun. He without any hesitation accepts all media members, and his club maintains peace and confidence in the top, not to impoverish them from media, fans, and other external sources. He keeps them happy and excited about coming to the ballpark and their minds are busy during long road journeys.

Although we may all question managers' moves, including Maddon, but when it comes to saying, it is commonly believed that Maddon was one of the biggest moves in Thea Epstein's executive career at Cubs.

"With all due respect to all other managers, I think he is the largest franchise manager in Chicago Cubs," said first soldier Anthony Rizzo for Maddon. "It was part of turning a historically lost mentality into a winning mentality, with a fan base and culture."

& Nbsp;

It's a game of a centimeter and a dollar. Latest sports news and assessment, signing, and employment analysis, once a week in your inbox, from the Forbes SportsMoney Playbook newsletter. & Nbsp;Sign up here.

">

Joe Maddon celebrates with Kris Bryant (17) after winning against Washington Nationals. (AP photo / Nick Wass)

RELATED TEXT

League league managers always had to live with a certain amount of stress, regardless of whether their clubs were in a dense bumblebee race or just struggling to overcome their talented opponents.

Governor's pressures come from several sources: writers, television and radio journalists, fans, owners, and players themselves.

The manager is doing his thing – on the stage – before the eyes of critics who like to get used to another man's guess, though rarely have as much information as possible about a certain field situation as he has.

The fact that his reasoning and conduct is constantly being subjected to public scrutiny helps little to nourish the nerves of the manager.

Neither the usual percentage of players who can interfere with these illusions of luxury or lack of self-discipline.

If professionals from other areas had to work under conditions similar to those facing MLB executives, half of them would be sent to the psycho-department before the end of the season.

Bejzbola managers, if nothing else, must learn to coexist with frustration. As they have done over the years, it depends on their ability to punish.

Young Joe Joe Maddon has a leader who has a very good control of his emotions. His most unusual feature is his positivity. He is always optimistic regardless of the situation and has the highest respect and conviction in all players wearing Cubo uniforms. Maddon also respects his opponents, but for the sake of maintaining a healthy mind, he is a master in keeping loose clubs and his team players on the same page.

"You can tell when someone is doing it," said Jon Lester for Maddon Chicago Sun-TimesLast spring he won the writer Gordon Wittenmyer in connection with his meeting with Maddons before signing the contract with the youth. "You can say when somebody fills you with a bunch of bs.s. Within 30 seconds, I knew he was, that's the person he is, that's the thing he believes. And he's very passionate about it.

Maddon is certainly passionate about winning and helping players succeed. But it does not interfere with his rejection or hatred for losing. He is just as competitive in the game as he is in the game, and when he is lost, many managers lose their calm and thoughts.

Billy Martin and Earl Weaver would flee from the steering wheel and would often be in conflict with some of their players.

Sparky Anderson, who never said anything bad, but often crossed over the build of the player even during a bad fall or a streak.

Fred Hutchinson, who skips Tigers, Cardinals and Reds, knew he was breaking things in the club.

Eddie Stanky, who was managing the cardinals, the White Sox, and the Rangers, would go back and forth in the field, monotonously pushing the baton.

Al Lopez, who led the Indiana and White Sox to the flag of A.L., would keep him inside and once told the journalist as he clapped his fingers on the table after a heavy loss, "I will not let this game kill me."

Big Casey Stengel from Yankees and Metsa who controls glory, told stories and maybe joined the drink writers or two a day.

Stengel, of course, had an extraordinary ability to reject his frustrations and hostilities. It would turn the dizziness of its listeners to eloquent non-sequiturs that would leave the novices in the rattling rhythm on their heads trying to figure out what the man was talking about.

The writer of Bejzbola in the hall of the famous Jerome Holtzman, who created the rescue, shared a memory of Stengel. It was a day when Casey visited Wrigley Field in Chicago as the manager of Metso. On the bench before the play time, Holtzman said the reporter decided to make a story about Stengel, not Mets, which was pretty awful at the time.

"How," replied Stengel, "did you get the name of Casey?"

It was a seemingly innocent inquiry that could lead to an interesting story, whether it was facts or fiction.

"Before Stengel breathed three times," said Holtzman, "he sounded like he would listen to his listeners on a non-stop tour through the history of the baseball. "When I first lived in Kansas City," Stengel said, having previously had large yards in the back of the house. They never had any playgrounds, so they had one, but that was the only one, and we used to play in those yards once, and we kicked football and threw it around, got the barrels and put them up there. and try to throw her through basketball.

Now, at that time, I was young and short, and they called me Dutch. My father called me Stengel, Jordan of my mother, and my middle name is Dillon. He was a judge. My mother called me the first name Charles.

Thing The best thing I know is that I went to baseball in 1910 when I went to Kankakee in the North Association and the league fell on July 4th and I'm out of business. I came to the power lines and it should take half the night.

"Once I knew a young girl in New York who had never arrived in New Jersey, but after I got to Kankakee, they would ask me," You from BC? "And I would say," Yes. "That's what it was, they had to change my name." He would say, "He's from K.C., and they would say," Hey K.C. "So the writers started using the name Casey."

Holtzman said that the talk of a journalist with Stengel continued for another 20 minutes with him in connection with playing in the Wisconsin-Illinois 1911 law of the fact that he was compiled by Brooklyn, that Cubans were not interested in him as a player, that he was not a house hit, how some people still call him Dutch, and a college high school student who became an actor before Stengel finished talking to the news before the game, "And so I got the name of Casey."

Stengel had a way to get to his point, but in the way nobody else could be honest, fun and entertaining for the writers.

Maddon was in the same way but completely different from Casey Stengel, who kept the reporters confused about decoding the meaning of his information.

Maddon is always honest, accurate and fun. He without any hesitation accepts all media members, and his club maintains peace and confidence in the top, not to impoverish them from media, fans, and other external sources. He keeps them happy and excited about coming to the ballpark and their minds are busy during long road journeys.

Although we may all question managers' moves, including Maddon, but when it comes to saying, it is commonly believed that Maddon was one of the biggest moves in Thea Epstein's executive career at Cubs.

"With all due respect to all other managers, I think he is the largest franchise manager in Chicago Cubs," said first soldier Anthony Rizzo for Maddon. "It was part of turning a historically lost mentality into a winning mentality, with a fan base and culture."

It's a game of a centimeter and a dollar. Latest sports news and analysis of ratings, signatures and employment, once a week, in the mailbox, from the Forbes SportsMoney Playbook newsletter. Sign up here.


Source link