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The Japanese cargo ship leaves the space station. Next Rate: Oblivion.



The Japanese freight carrier on Wednesday (November 7th) dismissed from the International Space Station for a weekend with a forgetfulness to complete a successful naval service.

The astronauts at the station dispatched the HTV-7 ship from the station using a robotic arm at 11:51 AM EST (1651 GMT), while each aircraft flew 254 miles above the North Pacific Ocean. The Japanese Aeronautical Research Agency (JAXA) launched a cargo ship at the end of September to deliver more than 5 tons (4.5 tons) of fresh food, science and other necessities.

"Expedition 57 would like to thank the entire JAXA program and engineering teams for impeccable design and execution of the HTV-7 mission," the commander of the Alexander Gerst station from the European Space Agency sent mission control after a successful separation. The ship's ship, he added, is an essential part of true international effort to support the only universe in the universe. Gerst uses the robotic arm to release HTV-7 with the support of NASA astronaut Serena Auñón Chancellor. [Japan’s Huge HTV Space Truck Explained (Infographic)]

JAXA's HTV cargo ships (short for H-2 lorries) are a one-time spacecraft for spaceships designed to deliver tons of space station supplies, and then go and intentionally ignite the Earth's atmosphere at the end of the mission. Spacecraft, also known as the Kounotori (Japanese "white race"), is part of the fleet of robotic cargo ships from Japan, Russia, Europe and the United States that have maintained the supply station over the last 18 years.

The HTV-7 cargo ship for Japan's aviation explosion was seen at the International Space Station on November 7, 2018. It delivers more than 5 tons of equipment in the orbiting lab.

The HTV-7 cargo ship for Japan's aviation explosion was seen at the International Space Station on November 7, 2018. It delivers more than 5 tons of equipment in the orbiting lab.

Credit: NASA TV

HTV-7 has delivered some key materials for the International Spacecraft team, including six new Solar Orbiting Solar Battery Batteries. He also wore two small cubes to experiment the spacecraft (which were scheduled on October 6) and a small re-entry capsule that would, first for Japan, try to return the experiments to Earth. If all is well, the capsule will be placed just before HTV-7 is released back to Earth via the South Pacific on Saturday (November 10th), NASA officials said.

It is called HTV Small Return Capsule, a cone car 2.7 m (0.8 m) wide, 1.12 m (0.6 m) high and weighs 397 pounds (kilograms).

This NASA graphical display of the site and the relative size of the Japanese HTV small return capsule on the HTV-7 cargo ship. The capsule will test the technology of returning samples when it lands on Earth on November 10, 2018.

This NASA graphical display of the site and the relative size of the Japanese HTV small return capsule on the HTV-7 cargo ship. The capsule will test the technology of returning samples when it lands on Earth on November 10, 2018.

Credit: NASA TV

"The capsule will be released from the opening after a dehydrated burn," NASA officials said in a statement. "The experimental capsule will take parachute-assisted splashdown from Japan's shore, where the JAXA ship will stand for recovery."

NASA officials have reported that the capsule carries the results of crystal protein experiments.

Gerst wanted the team behind the re-entry capsule of luck in the upcoming test of technology. It was he and his expedition of 57 crewmembers who packed the experiment load capsule and plugged it into HTC-7.

"Congratulations to all engineers involved in successful design and installation of small capsules for return, and we want the best for the upcoming, most interesting phase of the capsule return mission: re-entering and lowering."

E-mail Tariq Malik at [email protected] or follow it @tariqjmalik, Follow us @Spacedotcom and Facebook, Original article Space.com.


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