Saturday , January 23 2021

Picton is dry when it makes sense – now more than ever



Ferry waste returns to the Radar system of the Government, as it opens a public discussion of the MARPOL Annex VI agreement.

SCOTT HAMMOND / STUFF

Ferry waste returns to the Radar system of the Government, as it opens a public discussion of the MARPOL Annex VI agreement.

OPINION: Discussions are continuing on where a new dry dock is located in New Zealand.

It is obvious to me that Shakespeare Bay in Picton is an undeniably strategic place.

I understand that the biggest customers of the dry dock – Zeland Defense Force, KiwiRail and Strait Shipping – all in favor of Picton.

Picton's Shakepeare Bay, with its logging operations, was considered dry while interisland ferries used the main Picton port in the foreground.

THINGS

Picton's Shakepeare Bay, with its logging operations, was considered dry while interisland ferries used the main Picton port in the foreground.

Marking a good location for this nationally important facility is still imperative because our shipping industry faces some very significant changes to the international emissions trading agreement.

This will have to include the capability of modifying and upgrading the fleet to reduce emissions because, according to MARPOL Annex VI, flags of New Zealand flags in their present state will no longer be accepted on dry seaplanes, including: Singapore and Australia.

To be allowed there, they will need to completely clean their tanks and replace them with low-emission fuel, a costly and long-lasting task.

Currently, New Zealand is not a signatory to the agreement. We are behind that many of our major trading partners.

The New Zealand shipping federation believes methanol is the farthest solution to reducing emissions from the New Zealand shipping industry. However, the Taranaki methanol plant may be closed by 2026. This is the industry's problem with the government by presenting the Environment Selection Committee on legal changes for crown minerals (petroleum).

When New Zealand applies for MARPOL Annex VI, which should, a dry shipbuilding vessel would be beneficial and cost-effective. Picton's Shakespeare Bay would then be a sensible place to bunkering low-emission fuels – and for dry docks.

The bay is already operating as an hour and as the deepest natural berth in New Zealand, minimal or no dredging is required.

As a representative of Zajkooura, of course, I support this project because of the countless benefits that it would bring to our voter body. But this is a far bigger picture for the whole New Zealand.

Building a dry dock in Picton to service our boats, instead of sending them to another lesser port in New Zealand or overseas, actually brings better ecological results as well as cost savings that would be passed on to the consumer.

All this makes a lot of sense.

Stuart Smith is a deputy for the Kaikōura power station


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