Monday , June 14 2021

Soybean milk can exacerbate menstrual pain



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Study reveals infant feeding on soy formula milk has suffered worse menstrual pain in later life

Soy-based milk in infants can lead to increased menstruation a few years later.

The latest study investigating this relationship was related to data from 1,553 women between the ages of 23 and 35 who were enrolled in the US Environmental, Lifestyle and Fibroids Study between 2010 and 2012. Published today in Human Reproduction, one of the world's leading reproductive medicine journals, researchers. A total of 198 (13%) reported that they were fed with the dairy dairy formula.

They found that women who were ever fed with a soy formula as a baby 40% more likely to have used hormone contraceptives at some point in order to alleviate menstrual pain when compared to women who had not been fed strains of formula as babies; at the age of 18 to 22 years they were 50% more likely to have moderate or severe menstrual discomfort or pain in most of their periods.

"Many menstrual pain studies exclude women from hormonal contraception, but this may exclude those most commonly affected by menstrual pain because they can use pain relief drugs"

Dr. Kristen Upson, a Postdoctoral Advisor at the National Institute of Environmental Protection (NIEHS) at the National Institute of Health (NIH), North Carolina, USA, said: "Menstrual pain is the most frequent menstrual complaint and can have a significant impact on the quality of women's lives. estrogen during childhood development, such as soybean phytoestrogens, may affect reproductive health in adulthood.

When they were enrolled in the study, participants were asked whether they were fed with a soy formula as a baby, how long and would it begin in the first two months of birth. We encourage them to ask their mothers to help fill out the questionnaire, and 89% receive mother help.

Participants also interviewed the phone and wondered whether they ever took any prescription or prescription drug, including hormonal contraception, for treating or preventing menstrual cramps, chest pain or discomfort, the age at which the drug was first and whether they were still used. They were asked to use birth control pills, hormone implants, patches, rings or bullets, intrauterine devices, the age they started to use, and the reasons for their use. The researchers also asked participants about the incidence of moderate or severe menstrual discomfort or pain between the ages of 18 and 22.

His wife, Donna Baird, a senior NIEHS / NIH investigator, leads the Women's Health Group at the NIEHS Epidemiological Branch, said: "Many menstrual pain studies exclude women from hormonal contraception, but this may exclude those who are most affected by menstrual pain because they can use pain relievers. Our questions about previous women's experiences with menstrual pain have enabled us to include all women in the studio. "


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