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Desperate parents compare Fortnite to cocaine



The parents of 10-year-olds and 15-year-olds will sue gaming giant Epic Games through Canadian law firm Calex Légal.

Parents, according to CBC's Canadian television program, compare the game to cocaine.

They believe that the game is intentionally designed so that the brain secretes dopamine while it is being played and is therefore manipulated by the children's brain.

They claim that Epic Games has done everything they can to make Fortnite as addictive as possible, with the help of psychologists.

– When Epic Games created Fortnite, they hired psychologists year after year. They have dug themselves into the human brain and put great effort into making it as addictive as possible, says Calex Légal lawyer Alessandra Esposito Chartrand.

Aimed at young people

Chartrand and his colleagues have asked Montreal authorities to bring legal action against US giant Epic Games on behalf of 10-year-olds and 15-year-olds.

"They used the same tactics as creators of gaming and other rewards programs to make users addicted. The brain is manipulated to always want more. Children are particularly prone to this manipulation because their brain self-control system is underdeveloped,"
writes in a request to USA Today.

"They knowingly marketed a very, very addictive game that was aimed at young people," says attorney Chartrand.

He says the company was contacted by a 10-year-old and parents of a 15-year-old who believed the children were completely dependent on the game.

Chartrand now asks other parents who believe their children have become addicted to contact.

TV 2 wrote in April that the Blue Cross is now treating about 20 Norwegian families suffering from Fortnite addiction.

– Every day we have families who get help with the increase in gambling and the consequences it brings. We are also finding that growth queues are growing in the number of families in need, said communications manager Anders Blixhavn in Blå
Cross.

STAGE FILLING: American Bugha celebrates after winning a solo competition during the Fortnite World Cup in July. The competition was held at Arthur Ashe Stadium in New York.
STAGE FILLING: American Bugha celebrates after winning a solo competition during the Fortnite World Cup in July. The competition was held at Arthur Ashe Stadium in New York. Photo by Johannes Eisele / AFP

Missing warning

The lawsuit against Epic Games is based on a similar lawsuit from 2015, when the Quebec Supreme Court ruled that tobacco companies did not do enough to alert their customers to the dangers of smoking.

The Fortnite lawsuit claims that Epic Games knew the game was a dangerous addiction but did not warn players about it.

– In our case, two parents told us, "If we knew it was so contagious that it ruined the lives of the kids, we would never have let them start playing Fortnite or we would have followed it," Chartrand says.


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