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Sunday in Glastonbury 2019 – follow here! | music, music







Felicity Cloake's Glorious Gourmet Adventure continues

Lebanese Mezze. "Src ="

Missing … Lebanese Mezze. Photo: Felicity Cloake / The Guardian

Many people mention the authentic Lebanese booth Mezze in the Park area (which is also next to where I got another breakfast, but I've moved since I promise). They did not notice a lot of Middle Eastern things here, certainly not in comparison with Mexican and Indian, so I was delighted with that. The best was definitely spinach and feta fatayer pastry, which was unusually spinach-hard, and humus and baby ganoush – but again, he had to draw my trusty pot of salt because it all had a little oomph. Glastonbury seems clumsy.





Johnny Marr interviewed





Jessie Buckley looked at her

Jessie Buckley and the band. "Src ="

Jessie Buckley and the band. Photo: Gwilym Mumford / The Guardian

Rumors that Lady Gaga and Bradley Cooper to play the secret that had originated in Glastonbury might have been released by Emily Eavis, but there is another multiple performance of hits from their own music drama in their absence. Irish actor Jessie Buckley starred last year at Wild Rose, the charming British drama of attempts at a girl in Glasgow to break into a country music scene in Nashville. It was a pretext that was supported by the fact that Buckley had the love voice of veterans from Broadway, as has been proven here.

The peak is barnstorming, covered by Randy Newman's Guilty, but also Emmylou Harris's Born to Run cover. "This is fucking crazy – I can not believe it," she exclaims at one point, which is hard to imagine Gaga has ever delivered, but Buckley's proof is here as Hollywood's weight.

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Hi, Gwilym Mumford here, I'll take up the liveblog for the next few hours. Soon we will get Kylie, Miley and some D Attenborough. Stay with us!





Michael Cragg visits bees in BEAM

BEAM Sculpture by Wolfgang Buttressa. "Src ="

BEAM Sculpture by Wolfgang Buttressa. Photo: Michael Cragg / The Guardian

Located in the Greenpeace field near the skate park and 20,000 yards of rave trees BEAM, a specific wooden sculpture of Wolfgang Buttress that aims to highlight the condition of bees in the light of the climate crisis. "WHITE is a conversation and a symphony between the world of insects and us," explains Buttress, with the center of a huge wooden structure – wait – the hive of acoustic landscapes and flashing lights triggered by live food from the Bee Colony Worthy Farm. "These live signals are sculptured via a dedicated Internet connection," continues Buttress. "[The] algorithms will be used to convert these vibrational signals into light and sound effects, enabling visual and acoustic experience of the life of a black bee as a living experience. There will be no two moments.

If the sound of bees that passes through the ambient filter sounds a little bit one-time then the trombones are also boosted by musicians, including Spiritualized, Kelly Owens, Camille Christel, Matt Black and Coldcut. Like most things in Glastonbury, its use is multifaceted: some use the central space for yoga or simply run, while the giant wooden supporters surrounding it act as an improvised labyrinth.

It also does not go anywhere. "I am delighted that Michael Eavis will keep BEAM as a living bee hotel on her farm so that it can be re-imagined for Glastonbury," says Buttress. As the Beat Hotel pulls, the bee hotel revives.

BEAM Sculpture at Wolfgang Buttress. "Src ="

BEAM Sculpture by Wolfgang Buttressa. Photo: Michael Cragg / The Guardian

BEAM sculpture from Wolfgang Buttressa. "Src ="

BEAM Sculpture by Wolfgang Buttressa. Photo: Michael Cragg / The Guardian

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Glastonbury Glamor

Lauren Cochrane came out and wanted to capture the most elegant appearance on the field.

Alice Fry, 28, executive power in social media

Alice Fry. "Src ="

Alice Fry. Photo: David Levene / The Guardian

"Biking shorts – that's just the way everyone is going to go, is not it?" "I suppose it was born of Kylie Jenner and these people." I showed it to my friend who is really fashionable and worshiping him, that's Glastonbury, so everything goes Stormzy was the culmination – I think there are many truths in what he says.

Heather Doughy, 26, PR

Heather Doughy. "Src ="

Heather Doughy. Photo: David Levene / The Guardian

"Our group has a different theme every day – this time it's a sexy corn, a really niche reference from obscure musical. On Sunday we also have the lyric Billie Eilish and Disco Needs You for Kylie. This is already the third time. This is especially because they are all super-kind. We are a big LGBT group and everyone is feeling safe here. "

Laura Rietdyk-Johnson, 26, works in social media

Laura Rietdyk-Johnson. "Src ="

Laura Rietdyk-Johnson. Photo: David Levene / The Guardian

– I volunteer for Oxfam – I usually have the shine of the face. Glastonbury really inspires me to be what I want to be. Every day I have a different view – on Saturday I was completely green. I plan what I'm going to wear for months. "





He looked at Mavis Staples


"The Real Meaning and Power" … Mavis Staples performs on the pyramid stage. Photo: Neil Hall / EPA

From the spiritual awakening of the Choral Methodist Choir to the Social Awakening. From the stage, everyone can drop empty bromides of peace and love, but the 79-year-old Mavis Staples gives her the true meaning and power in this absolutely magnificent Scene Set of the Pyramids. Her songs about love and social justice are full of simple, dignified but poetic truths: "What is freedom if we have not learned to be free?" She laughed early. These open questions harden and stimulate Who said to you, "We do not want to throw a ship – who told you that?" She laughed, brilliantly tattered and lupine.

Through the classic 12-bar electric blues and the cover of an activist hymn For what's up to Buffalo Springfield, she warms her heart back, praising the audience in a magnificent, angry scream to "touch someone!" to each other. He finishes with the statement "yes – I do not know how to call him – the one in the White House," prays for the reform of arms and the closure of the closing of migrant children at the US border. "Maybe I'm just kandidiram for president!" She decided. Already has 10,000 or insured votes.





Left Field Debate: How to resist the rise of hatred with the hope of not hating

The writer and activist Reni Eddo-Lodge expressed very clearly at the beginning of the Leftfield debate this afternoon that the panelists will not discuss "why racism is bad". Speakers – Matthew Collins from Hope Not Hate, Faiza Shaheen from think tank, Sheffield's mysterious Mayor, Majid and Amos Schonfeld, founder of Youth Movement Our Second Home – have done a lot in the past. Instead, this debate was focused on action and solutions, exploring what resistance means when the ultimate right-wing ideology becomes more and more mainstream.

On ban or non-platforming as a tactic for the backslide, Majid talked about his move, which initiated the title and banned Donald Trump from the city of Sheffield during his state visit: "Yes, America are our friends, but when my friend is a dick I say: "Shaheen, who stands at Ian Duncan Smith in Chingford in the next general election, partly as a protest against his" incredibly cruel "social welfare reform, said that he had" been celebrating, assembling. "Others spoke of the importance of compassion and celebration of diversity. finds herself correcting her assumptions about people when she goes to Ukip's voters and revealing them open to change her mind. "Just in conversation and humanizing … You'd be surprised how far you can work with some people."

However, the most important point that every panelist repeated was the need to challenge ruthless rhetoric wherever and whenever we see it, even if it means reacting to "endless abuse, diet and death threats" on Twitter, as well as for an activist Matta Collins. "We have to fight for what we believe." For Majid, just to be visible and consistently loyal to her underlying beliefs is a way of fighting hate. When he was appointed as a mayor, he encouraged abuse, he says, "Suddenly I realized that my existence was just a form of resistance." Despite racist hate speech, he refused to alleviate his policy. "I'm a black Muslim refugee – how can not I be politically?" If you're trying to be tea from someone's tea, you can also have a cup.

Vikas Shah MBE
(@MrVikas)

Amazing board with @MattHopeNotHate @MagicMagid @faizashaheen @renireni @AJSchonfield on @GlastoFest @GlastoLive pic.twitter.com/jm7yT3Smvg


June 30, 2019





Alma reviewed it

Alma says it's on stage at John Peel. "Src =" https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/5b7d6bc4cc92450fc2f50a7b153e6300a87e5077/0_0_1600_1200/master/1600.jpg?width=300&quality=85&auto=format&fit= max && = 9cdbde43be9b19bc7dbe3bf9a7e64a18

Alma says it's on stage at John Peel. Photo: Michael Cragg / The Guardian

If Glastonbury needed a wake-up call on his last day, then the Finnish Alma was there to deliver: her brand of drunken agit-pop, delivered in a flurry of thunder, could revive the dead. "Dance, fucking dance," she sings in the first two minutes, walking on stage as a stationary Cyberdog employee – all lime green hair, matching silk shirt and skull jewelery.

"You're as awkward as you are early," she says right before she takes a pulsating cowboy, and her giant picture with two middle flickers on her screen. Sometimes the feeling of discomfort feels a bit involuntary – suitably called Good Vibe is too lively to deliver angrily – but gathering young girls in the first row can not get enough.

It's also a perfect pop for a new generation of genre-based agnostics, with a self-inflammatory legend that fits hip-hop and big crunchy rock guitar, while EDM drops are pouring through M's collaboration with Dance Wiv Me. If he occasionally finds that he can switch too close to generic radio frequency – and there is still a sense of fighting for a hit – in a live scenario it is encouraged by Alma's tireless stage.

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Get to know the supervisors who camped at the beginning of the Pyramid stage

Cas, 54, and Sue, 60

(LR) Sue and Cas are waiting for Kylie Minogue. "Src =" 7a4c18735c02975752cb84a2c09871a3

(L-R) Sue and Cas are waiting for Kylie Minogue. Photo: Ammar Kalia / Guardian

Sue: "This is a lifetime experience – I wanted to come forever and happily, my partner had at last received tickets. This year I celebrate my 60th birthday and I can not imagine anything better than being on the front for Kylie. It was sad that she had to cancel her last play here because she was sick so she would be emotional when she came back – I can not wait to dance with her. "

Gemma, 34

Gemma is waiting for Kylie. "Src ="

Gemma is waiting for Kylie. Photo: Ammar Kalia / Guardian

"Kylie's my idol since I was very young – I dressed like her when we had school days in the mufti!" This is my first Glastonbury and I can not believe my luck playing – I want to be as close as I can. I love everything about her. "

Joanne, 35

Joanne is preparing for Kylie. "Src ="

Joanne is preparing for Kylie. Photo: Ammar Kalia / Guardian

"Kylie just does not do bad songs, right?" She is a true legend and I want to be headed and centered when she is on. There is something special about being on the front of the Pyramid stage – the last time I saw Jacksone and emptied tears, I'm sure Kylie will be equally special. "

Michelle, 53, Shona, 44

(L-R) Michelle and Shona. "Src ="

(L-R) Michelle and Shona. Photo: Ammar Kalia / Guardian

Michelle: "We've even come from Australia for Glastonbury and it's amazing that Kylie plays, and I've seen it three times and every time it broke it out." Once I made a Kylie flash mob at the Royal Opera House in Sydney, how incredible it was to return to the performance after she had canceled because she was sick before – she will get all the love she needs from us and this crowd.

Luke, 25

Luke leaned forward for Kylie. "Src ="

Luke leaned forward for Kylie. Photo: Ammar Kalia / Guardian

"I just do not want to go home – they all feel blues today, so I'm really excited to be able to dance with Kylie, that's a massive choice." She has such a great catalog of fun pleasures – her performance will keep me going through the next week when I come home and just want to be here. "





He reviewed the choir of Lang's Methodist Church

The Langan Methodist church choir is performed on the pyramid stage. "Src =" 6ed6d8d05cbae5a687bf86892f9de1f4

On the stage of the pyramid is the choir of the Langa Methodist Church. Photo: Ben Beaumont-Thomas / Guardian

Anyone who goes back to their tent after the whole night in the stone circle must have thought that he is experiencing divine intervention: the sound of a beautiful choral music that drains through the pyramid stage field. It comes from the chain of chains of the Methodist Church, Cape Town, which Eavis had met during a humanitarian tour, and then invited to play this year's festival – a serious logistics venture involving dozens of art visas and the kind of effort that some other festivals would have done,

Their songs that ask God to see them and do not leave them stranded – feelings that will no doubt whistle with many horoscopic visitors to the festival – rise up and rise to the back of the field. Dressed in black dresses with beautiful details, such as green roses and head inserts, is accompanied by a hand-held drum that gives weight and rhythm to these believers. This hit of absolute beauty spiritually harmonizes the whole place – leaving him ready to repeat for the last time tonight.

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Felicity's roughness continues

The healing vision in the Types field. "Src ="

Healing Vision on Field Type. Photo: Felicity Cloake

"He had a noise around the healing field, and then decided that the most healthy thing I could do for myself was to bring a vegan chai and a raw cookie to a vegan cafe at the entrance to the field type and go a little and lie in the hangout network. The right decision: the bee It was good, especially for something without butter – very stupid and fruity with a decent nose wrap – and chai nicely spicy and not too sweet. They look like they're taking their coffee too seriously. "

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Reviewed by Chemical Brothers


"Luscious and Overwhelming" … title of Chemical Brothers Other Stages, June 29, 2019. Photo: David Levene / The Guardian

One of last night:

Earlier on Saturday, Liam Gallagher looked back on his set as part of his "current residency in Glastonbury." On the other hand, Chemical Brothers could easily make a similar statement. For anyone who grew up watching Glastonbury on TV, the sound of Hey Boy, Hey Girl who is flickering over the installation of Worthy Farm is known. So there is nostalgia built into their set, strengthened by the dark skies, the constant smoke of the flash flood and the great density of the Glastonbury icons – but not to the extent that a pile of swabs awaiting hits,

The material from the new album No Geography is equally joyfully chaotic as the stuff from their peak – a chemical explosion of glowing syntheses with a perverted robot. They start brave, breathless transitions, from stormy sirens lurking like a seamless orchestra to a heavily overloaded, glittering shine, a similar effect to falling off the cliff. Saturated, 2007 We Are The Night, a delightful and powerful, powerful jazz drummer waving in the midst of its upcoming synthesizers. With Tom Rowlands and Edom Simons, who are in the synthetic deck of the pilot cabin, the visuals bring the playfulness into the heart of their music – the new song Got to Keep On, has the best of that, a silky pink Michelin man made of petals spreading along the strips for jogging.

Nothing, obviously, is not as visceral as their wonderful spare performance hit: They tease Hey Boy, Hey Girl with a flirty intro, then activate that noise and cry – "Here we go!"; Galvanization still sounds persistently scary. It is easy to overlook Chems as their hippie, more avant-garde heirs take over – as they should – but in their spiritual home, they prove why they would always be British beloved rave dads.

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Meeting with BSL translators

Tara Asher

Pat Colin Paterson 📺
(@ColinGPaterson)

Only 4 UK language translators in the UK are Grime Specialists. Tara Asher has signed Stormzy's Glaston set for deaf visitors.
Each song was practiced for one day. This is a joy. She loves her job. Please take a look at the clock. @BritishSignBSL & # 39; deafzone1 # glastonbury19 pic.twitter.com/OkeW9irIoG


June 29, 2019

Tara Asher has become viral this weekend because of the BSL interpretation of Stormzy's title. Addressing the Guardian before the set, she explained that she was preparing her as a lifelong fan for the show:

"Sign language is my first language – I have family members who are deaf." But I never even thought about it [interpreting music] until I went to several festivals with my deaf friends, and then I saw the need for that. There are not many translators who interpret music and make festivals, there is a lack of national level. Not all deaf people in music, there are some who are, and some are not, the same way that not everyone who hears wants to go to a music festival. I know there are some of the greatest deaf fans in Stormzy here, so it's really nice to know they will get a wonderful experience.

"I've been listening to dirt music since Risky Roadz, from the very beginning, so it's easier for me to understand the context, slang, all that stuff. Yes, dirt is often faster, but sometimes you can get a rock song that's very difficult to convey a sign language, but every one for yours, I like to keep the dirt. "

Bastille performs on Friday at the stage of the pyramid. "Src ="

Bastille performs on Friday at the stage of the pyramid. Photo: Guy Bell / REX / Shutterstock

Benjamin Gorman

Volunteer DeafZonea Benjamin Gorman is the first deaf translator for BSL working in Glastonbury. On Friday, he interpreted the set of Bastille's Pyramid for the Deaf Public. He told the guard:

"Glastonbury is a fantastic music festival, but it's not just about music; it is about the atmosphere, it is about drug trafficking, as well as the nice food we are surrounded by and the excessive number of sun we are experiencing. Festivals are not only about music but about the overall experience as part of the festival and [interpreting is] that a deaf person can take part in it. There are different listening levels that a person can have. Some deaf have the rest of the hearing and can hear well; some do not have the rest of the hearing, but they can experience music through vibrations. Also, the atmosphere really connects you with works and artists. So the festival is an experience in itself.

– The important thing is the approach. For deaf people, they deserve to have the same experience as everyone else who pays a ticket for going to the festival. For me, I think we have to show that deaf people are capable [interpreting] also."

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And we got back

Good morning from a mildly cool Guardian hut where the constitution is a bit fragile, but the morale remains high. On the ladder of "Stone Circle" and "Brandon Flowers on the Main Stage", our performances can get closer to the past, but we do everything in our power to bring some of the Killers' Vegas shine into today's liveblog. Before that starts seriously, let's look back at their five-star performance – with guest spots by Pet Shop Boy and Johnny Marra – Alexis Petridis declared bona fide Glastonbury Moment.

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