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Getting the most out of every work experience




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Every job you take has value, whether it's an internship, a short-term concert or a full-time career. Even jobs that you do not like have added value in some way. Actually you can learn more from a bad experience than from a completely good one, simply because you will stop and think about it on a deeper level.

Good or bad, every job offers you the opportunity to learn something new. You can end up hating work and just about everything on it – but there's still a lesson to learn. Perhaps you do not realize the lessons you are learning while they are happening, and sometimes they will not even be evident until a few years later, but they are certainly there. It's all in the way you look at things.

Do not discount the experience.

Sometimes you find yourself in a job that you think is going nowhere. This is especially true when you are just starting your career, or if you have recently made a pivot and are working in a lower level position than your previous job. The truth is that you are learning and developing skills in these jobs that you will carry with you for the rest of your career. Challenge yourself to discover those skills and you will realize how much you have learned from every job you have had.

Think of the & nbsp; the first job that most people take – working every hour in the retail trade, in a restaurant or in another service sector. You are overworked and underpaid, but you are learning some of the most valuable lessons of your entire career. You are building your skills in customer service, rapid resolution, multitasking and troubleshooting. Learn how to keep customers happy while keeping company and your boss happy. These are lessons that you will need incredibly well in every subsequent work you will do.

Get the good with the bad guy.

No work is perfect, so there will always be bad times next to the good ones. For each negative, try to find a positive that fulfills it. It is a matter of understanding the lesson you can learn from the negative experience and using it as a guide to make sure that you do not repeat your next job. It could be as extensive as the fact that you do not like the type of work required by work, or how to identify a model of toxic behavior. Often lessons learned from the negatives serve as guidelines for what not to do in the future.

For example: you have a garment that has been overly critical. This is a negative point, but a positive lesson. You have learned what not to do as a leader and this can help you when you become the boss and you are responsible for a team. Take it a step further and really analyze the situation. What was the problem in particular? Was that how the boss spoke to people, or how they behaved? By analyzing the negatives it is possible to extract valuable lessons and to be taken from them.

Ask yourself two questions.

What am I doing well? & # 39; And & # 39; What could I do better? & # 39 ;. These two questions will help you get even more from your work experience. Answering these questions will help you take an introspective look at your performance rather than focusing all your attention on the work itself. It's easy to attribute all the blame to the job, but there's always something you can do to improve your performance.

By focusing your attention on yourself and your performance, you will be able to look at things with greater clarity. If you're frustrated with a particular aspect of work, think about why. Is it something you can control? If it is, find out what you need to do to improve the situation. By improving yourself, you should find the drop in frustration levels. If it's something you can not control, it's probably not worth your mental energy and it's not something you should focus on. If the work itself is not exceptional, think about what you can do to improve it.

Above all, keep an open mind in every job you do. Remember that there is always a lesson to learn and every job helps you grow and develop. The skills you develop in every job will stay with you throughout your career. You never know, the least favored work could end up being the most precious in a few years along the way.

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Every job you do has value, whether it's an internship, a short-term concert or a full-time career. Even jobs that you do not like have added value in some way. Actually you can learn more from a bad experience than from a completely good one, simply because you will stop and think about it on a deeper level.

Good or bad, every job offers you the opportunity to learn something new. You can end up hating work and just about everything on it – but there's still a lesson to learn. Perhaps you do not realize the lessons you are learning while they are happening, and sometimes they will not even be evident until a few years later, but they are certainly there. It's all in the way you look at things.

Do not discount the experience.

Sometimes you find yourself in a job that you think is going nowhere. This is especially true when you are just starting your career, or if you have recently made a pivot and are working in a lower level position than your previous job. The truth is that you are learning and developing skills in these jobs that you will carry with you for the rest of your career. Challenge yourself to discover those skills and you will realize how much you have learned from every job you have had.

Think about the first job most people do: work in an hourly position in the retail, restaurant, or other service sector. You are overworked and underpaid, but you are learning some of the most valuable lessons of your entire career. You are building your skills in customer service, rapid resolution, multitasking and troubleshooting. Learn how to keep customers happy while keeping company and your boss happy. These are lessons that you will need incredibly well in every subsequent work you will do.

Get the good with the bad guy.

No work is perfect, so there will always be bad times next to the good ones. For each negative, try to find a positive that fulfills it. It is a matter of understanding the lesson you can learn from the negative experience and using it as a guide to make sure that you do not repeat your next job. It could be as extensive as the fact that you do not like the type of work required by work, or how to identify a model of toxic behavior. Often lessons learned from the negatives serve as guidelines for what not to do in the future.

For example: you have a garment that has been overly critical. This is a negative point, but a positive lesson. You have learned what not to do as a leader and this can help you when you become the boss and you are responsible for a team. Take it a step further and really analyze the situation. What was the problem in particular? Was that how the boss spoke to people, or how they behaved? By analyzing the negatives it is possible to extract valuable lessons and to be taken from them.

Ask yourself two questions.

What am I doing well? & # 39; And & # 39; What could I do better? & # 39 ;. These two questions will help you get even more from your work experience. Answering these questions will help you take an introspective look at your performance rather than focusing all your attention on the work itself. It's easy to attribute all the blame to the job, but there's always something you can do to improve your performance.

By focusing your attention on yourself and your performance, you will be able to look at things with greater clarity. If you're frustrated with a particular aspect of work, think about why. Is it something you can control? If it is, find out what you need to do to improve the situation. By improving yourself, you should find the drop in frustration levels. If it's something you can not control, it's probably not worth your mental energy and it's not something you should focus on. If the work itself is not exceptional, think about what you can do to improve it.

Above all, keep an open mind in every job you do. Remember that there is always a lesson to learn and every job helps you grow and develop. The skills you develop in every job will stay with you throughout your career. You never know, the least favored work could end up being the most precious in a few years along the way.


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