Thursday , September 19 2019
Home / unitedstates / The San Francisco police chief admitted a mistake in the attack on a journalist's home: NPR

The San Francisco police chief admitted a mistake in the attack on a journalist's home: NPR



San Francisco police chief Bill Scott answers questions during the May 21 press conference. Scott apologized for the search of a free journalist's home.

Eric Risberg / AP


hide the title

include title

Eric Risberg / AP

San Francisco police chief Bill Scott answers questions during the May 21 press conference. Scott apologized for the search of a free journalist's home.

Eric Risberg / AP

Police Chief San Francisco, Bill Scott, apologized Friday for a recent attack on a free-lance home journalist in connection with the unauthorized leak of a police report on the death of a former public defender.

The abrupt death of 59-year-old Jeff Adachi in February, the subsequent leak of the police report and the police action of May 10, executed with a liqueur, stirred up local sensitivities in the city, proud of its reputation as a progressive haven for free expression and respect of the First Amendment.

Scott said Chronicle of San Francisco that the searches of the home and office of free journalist Bryan Carmody were probably illegal, saying, "I'm sorry this has happened."

In a statement released late on Friday, Scott said he sought an independent criminal investigation by its foreign affairs department to determine the source of the death of Jeff Adachi. The former public defender was critical of the police. Scott expressed concern about the lack of due attention of the department's investigators in obtaining search warrants and possible violations of the California law that protects journalists from disclosing their sources.

Scott said Chronicle that the search requests for Carmody's home search did not adequately identify him as a journalist. Scott also said that officers who executed orders broke the department's policy, not first consulting the district prosecutor's office.

The controversy overwhelmed the London Police Breed's police administration and mayor since armed guards came to Carmody's home and used a hammer at the entrance door of his home, subverting his computers, phones, and other devices. The police put their fists on their hands and held Carmody for several hours, questioning how he came to have a police report on Adachi's death.

As reported by Laurel Wamsley, NPR

"A few hours after Adach's fall in San Francisco's apartment, details of the police investigation into his death had already appeared in news reports, according to San Francisco Chronicle.

"Several details in the police report were rude, suggesting that perhaps one or more police department members were trying to ruin the reputation of Adachi, who was known as a police guard and a fierce advocate of the criminal justice reform." Francisco, the public defender is an elected position.

"City superintendents harshly criticized police administration for improper leakage of the report. Adachi's widow called it" down ".

"The coroner later determined that Adachi had died as a result of a random overdose of cocaine and alcohol."

The excuse of Chief Scotta was a turnaround since just two days ago when he suggested that Carmody was involved in criminal conspiracy to get a police report. Last week he defended the attack.

The controversy in San Francisco has triggered a storm over the first amendment and the protection of media freedom.


Source link