Sunday , May 16 2021

Disease rises in the floods in North Qld



Hundreds of flood victims are fighting the outbreak of fever, infections and health problems after a catastrophe that occurred in North Queensland.

It is estimated that nearly 1,000 people are still homeless, vacancies for rent are almost zero, and some of the 3,500 families affected by floods are waiting in limbo to renovate and return home within two months.

Officials in Public Health said Courier mail The latest data on various types of flood-related illnesses and confirmed cases show a "significant" impact of a record event in February that flooded the city.

Viruses worn by a mosquito, like the Ross River virus, jumped and two people died of melioidosis of tropical disease from contact with contaminated waterborne waters that rose to the waist in some suburbs.

Melanie Bragg was subjected to blood tests and antibiotic treatment of melioidosis caught in a flood in Townsville. Image: Liam Kidston

Melanie Bragg was subjected to blood tests and antibiotic treatment of melioidosis caught in a flood in Townsville. Image: Liam Kidston

New studies reveal 60 cases of Ross River virus, 19 cases of melioidosis, and 45 cases of gastrointestinal cryptosporidium.

For each case of melioidosis, there were 15 to 20 cases of staph-like infections (up to 380) with severe illness.

Italian Worker in gym Melanie Bragg, 25, is still subjected to blood tests and treatment of melioidosis antibiotics picked up in a purge in her family home in the suburbs of Oonon.

"I had fever, shaking, fatigue, muscle and joint pain, and still coming and going," said the mentor of mental health.

Lindle Hanran with her daughters Zara, 8, and Bailee, 4, in the flooded living room of her home in Lauri Court, Deeragun. Image: Evan Morgan

Lindle Hanran with her daughters Zara, 8, and Bailee, 4, in the flooded living room of her home in Lauri Court, Deeragun. Image: Evan Morgan

"That's why I wondered how much other people got and how many others did not test or diagnose."

Dr. Julie Mudd, a public health bureau in Townsville, said that public messaging during a flood event led to early detection of many potentially serious infections, which prevented patients from becoming critical.

MELIOIDOSIS 650X366.jpg

MELIOIDOSIS 650X366.jpg

"There were no clear outbreaks as a result of the flood, however, the impact on health was still significant," the doctor said.

"Since they are melioidosis, leptospirosis and legionella diseases of the wet season, we will continue to follow them until the wetting season is over.

"From heavy rains there have been some viruses that are transported to mosquitoes, like the Ross River virus, which is transmitted to bushes or swamp moss."

Dr. Julie Mudd from the Public Health Department of Townsville. Image: Zak Simmonds

Dr. Julie Mudd from Public Health Unit in Townsville. Image: Zak Simmonds

Dr. Mudd said that it is important to be aware of the stress and emotional impacts that can continue to affect people over time and are not a direct consequence of flood water.

"Everyday symptoms can be aggravated by strain and stress and may signal serious conditions. People should seek medical help from their GPs for any problems."

Officials also issued a warning to Townsville's mummies on Friday after three cases of highly contagious diseases that are not associated with floods and appearing as a red rash.


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