Thursday , May 6 2021

Fallout 76 is not just a game, it's a "Fallout platform"



Fallout 76 it can be the future of Fallout games, at least in the foreseeable future.

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Fallout does not work well as a live online game. So when will he return to his one-legged roots with a tangible narrative, modding, console-based, and NPC-based roots? Maybe not long. We know that Bethesda realizes two next-generation projects that will not only boost their technology to new heights, but promise to provide "great and crazy" experiences: your brand new space epic IP Starfield, i Older Spades VIAt this stage, Fallout 76 could be the last Fallout game we will get for a while.

This makes sense because of the huge investment Bethesda invested in Fallout 76 and what this might mean for the future. We've been describing the way of playing live here for a long time TweakTown, and if successful, these games often last for years and years. Bethesda hopes that Fallout 76 will do the same. Actually, Exd Todard Howard's studio says the game is about to start some kind of Fallout platform. It is possible that Fallout 76 is just the beginning of an expansive ecosystem that connects to an online framework for continuing content, releases and engagements (just like all live games).

"Our goal is to build a kind of Fallout platform, and we do not even know what's going to be." We've got tons of ideas and it's been a boring wild road, but we're excited where it comes and lots of cool content " Howard said recently Panel Bethesda playing days at PAX East.

"Although we feel like we do so much, there is much, much more work and we have so many ideas."

Fallout 76 was made out of three great reasons: 1) Bethesda wanted to try another experiment to see if Fallout fit into the online box; 2) The studio and its parent company, ZeniMax Media, provide income from games through micro transactions; and 3) to ensure that IP lives, while Bethesda switches to other major multi-year projects.

In many ways, Fallout 76 is designed to imitate The Elder Scrolls Online.

On-line Fallout is a kind of stop-gap that will make money through time through micro-transactions, and keep the players involved in the series between big games. Even Wolfenstein is forced into this approach: a new game, Youngblood, is an online co-op game designed to make money through micro transactions and include players MachineGames works on Wolfenstein 3.

Elder Scrolls Online has hired millions of players between Skyrim and the upcoming Elder Scrolls VI, and Fallout 76 could do the same. If Bethesda corrects it, of course.

Read also: If Fallout 76 is doing so well, why add more micro-transactions?

But that's not exactly the news. All games are live platforms inside the platform. The news is that Fallout 5 is probably a long, long way. We certainly had traces from Bethesd's upcoming games, but the allegations that Fallout 76 is a major obstacle to the studio strongly suggests that it's all we'll get for a while … which is a bit worrisome.

In addition, Bethesda can boost progress in a more controlled and consolidated ecosystem for its games.

Bethesda.net is the first real incentive for this control. Studio originally locked most of its first PC games on PC platforms, but has happily relaxed and started running its titles at Steam. However, any kind of network integration or support mode must be run through the service. There is also Creation Club, an attempt to resurrect paid-up modes for consoles and PCs.

These initiatives were just the beginning, and Fallout 76 is another major move in their plans. Not only will we see more and more Bethesdian features customized in live-oriented games (Wolfenstein: Youngblood has online collaboration with micro-transactions, for example) but we could see a more unified incentive in this approach to playing as a platform linking headlines within Bethesda.net.

This could be a great idea in some respects. But from what we have seen in Fallout 76, Bethesda has a lot to learn about live games and how to manage certain services.

Fortunately, Bethesda seems to go back and forth between live games and the experiences we all know and love.

"Fallout 76 is a very new thing for our studio, we knew we would have a lot of punches with the game, and we definitely had some, and some of them were harder than we expected, a very new and different project for us, Todd Howard continued to work.

"We're still doing other things that are more traditional Bethesda games."

Whatever this new Fallout platform has become, I hope there is still room for an offline singleplayer game. I had to see Bethesda turning completely into the gaming area because until now they are not very good at it … at least when it comes to Fallout 76.


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